Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 107-110
Quantitative Estimation of Casein in Different Milk Samples
Mussarat Jabeen, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Mamoona Anwar, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Warisha Fatima, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Adeeba Saleem, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Khadija Rehman, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Maryum Masood, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Numaira Iqbal, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Saima Anjum, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Ansa Madeeha Zafar, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Noreen Aslam, Department of Chemistry, Govt. Sadiq College Women University, Bahawalpur, Pakistan
Received: Jun. 23, 2020;       Accepted: Jul. 13, 2020;       Published: Jul. 30, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjac.20200803.13      View  222      Downloads  162
Abstract
Milk is an important part of human life and supposed to be a nutritious food which contain about 80% proteins. Milk proteins consist of 80% casein (soluble protein), 2-8% lactose (milk fat) and remaining is whey (byproduct of cheese and casein manufacture). Casein is more important and contain almost all essential amino acids. The purpose of the present work was to estimate the amount of casein in different milk samples including natural milk (cow, buffalo, sheep and goat) both in boiled and un-boiled form and ultra-high temperature processed (Nestle Milk pack, Olper’s and Everyday Liquid) milk. In all the milk samples Nestle Milk pack contains high casein (g/100mL) 7.39±0.021 while cow milk contains lowest casein (g/100mL) 4.91±0.036 in un-boiled form and 4.75±0.025 in boiled form. Milk is supposed to be more beneficial if quantity of casein increases. From this research it is concluded that sheep milk is more beneficial with casein percentage 5.64±0.01 in un-boiled milk and 5.52±0.021 in boiled milk sample in case of natural milk samples while in tetra-packs Nestle Milk pack is beneficial with casein percentage 7.18±0.021 and 7.39±0.021 casein (g/100mL).
Keywords
Casein, Milk, Precipitation, Amino Acids, Bahawalpur
To cite this article
Mussarat Jabeen, Mamoona Anwar, Warisha Fatima, Adeeba Saleem, Khadija Rehman, Maryum Masood, Numaira Iqbal, Saima Anjum, Ansa Madeeha Zafar, Noreen Aslam, Quantitative Estimation of Casein in Different Milk Samples, Science Journal of Analytical Chemistry. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2020, pp. 107-110. doi: 10.11648/j.sjac.20200803.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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